Terracotta ham pot – 19th century – Charente – [PA067]
Terracotta ham pot – 19th century – Charente – [PA067]
Terracotta ham pot – 19th century – Charente – [PA067]

THE FLOWER BOX FOR FLOWERS
THE KITCHEN STOVE FOR FOOD
THE JAMBONNIERE FOR… HAMS!

Let’s rediscover a made-to-measure utensil born of peasant common sense and the talent of the potters of Sainte-Eutrope.

To make a success of your homemade raw ham, it’s both simple and precise. First of all, it is advisable to choose a breeder who respects his animals and allows them to live in the open air. The real happiness of the pig is to be able to search the earth to unearth some food. The french term “fouir” (burrow/grub) was invented to designate this jubilant use of the snout in wild boar as in domestic pigs.

Provided with a ham of good provenance, therefore, the preparation is done according to the following steps:

  • Wash the ham in clear water.

  • Rub it with eau de vie.

  • Pepper the flesh and generously around the bone to discourage any invasion of insects.

  • Sprinkle it with two ladles of ash on the flesh and bone side.

  • Place it on vine shoots in a clay or wooden container.

  • Cover it entirely with coarse salt in which it must remain in a dry and cool place, allow 10 days for 5 kilos.

  • Take it out of the salt and rub it again with brandy and pepper.

  • Suspend it in a protective net near the hearth or in any case in a dry and ventilated place.

  • Let it dry thus protected for ideally two months.

  • Savor it in thin slices and always think before replacing it in its net to pepper well around the bone to enjoy your homemade raw ham to the last bit.

So in summary, you need a good ham, a liter of eau de vie, very dry vine shoots, two ladles of wood fire ashes, fine pepper and coarse salt in sufficient quantity to cover your ham.

And if in Périgord in particular, it is a wooden crate that is used to store the ham in coarse salt, the ultimate in the matter remains the famous terracotta ham box which literally takes the shape of the ham to be received. A truly remarkable typically Charentaise creation.

Two handles located at the back and at the front make it easy to lift the ham box once filled.
Two handles located at the back and at the front make it easy to lift the ham box once filled.

The one we present here shows the signature of its master potter, very proud of its achievement.

We observe on its enamel shades of gray tones, yellow ocher and even burnt sienna, resulting from the principle of firing which exceeds 1000° C. Which means that the ham boxes of this type are all made of stoneware.

This material, “gréseux” (like sandstone), is particularly recognizable on the close-up of this ham pot.
This material, “gréseux” (like sandstone), is particularly recognizable on the close-up of this ham pot.
The ultimate in cured ham salting remains the famous terracotta ham dish which literally takes the shape of the ham to be received. A truly remarkable typically Charentaise creation. The one we offer here presents the signature of its master potter, very proud of its achievement.
The ultimate in cured ham salting remains the famous terracotta ham dish which literally takes the shape of the ham to be received. A truly remarkable typically Charentaise creation. The one we offer here presents the signature of its master potter, very proud of its achievement.

They come, to be precise, from pottery centers established until the 19th century in Charente, around the village of Sainte-Eutrope.

Shades of grey, yellow ocher and even burnt sienna are observed on the enamel of this Charentaise ham pot, resulting from the principle of making which exceeds 1,000° Celsius (1,830 °F). Which means that the ham pots of this type are all made of stoneware.
Shades of grey, yellow ocher and even burnt sienna are observed on the enamel of this Charentaise ham pot, resulting from the principle of making which exceeds 1,000° Celsius (1,830 °F). Which means that the ham pots of this type are all made of stoneware.

A decorative object, this stoneware ham pot could just as well be used again and delight enlightened amateurs wishing to eat healthily by rediscovering these peasant recipes of yesteryear, jewels of an art of living as tasty as it respects the cycle of life.

Dimensions

Length: 73 cm, widest: 43 cm, narrowest: 17 cm, height: 16 cm.

Reference: [PA067]

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